Nappy Consent

This topic contains 3 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  williamthebold 4 months, 1 week ago. This post has been viewed 206 times

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  • #82778
    Tulip
    Tulip
    Participant

    I understand if you thought this post should be in the Jokes column, but it is true. I read in the Weekend Australian this morning(unfortunately, I am now unable to find the actual article!)
    Sexuality safety educator Deanne Carson made the comment during an ABC News segment, families should establish “a culture of consent” in the home by asking “I’m going to change your nappy now, is that OK ?”

    #82779

    williamthebold
    Participant

    (I hope Deanne Carson is referring to babies)
    My thinking is that we have a duty of care to our children.
    If your baby says no, do you leave him/her/them in that rather undesirable state?
    I think not!
    I doubt that many babies would be able to give a well thought out and logical response anyway.
    Older children would not usually congregate around at such a time to hear a request for consent?
    And if they did, they would probably think it was silly?
    Another way of illustrating consent is preferable?
    Discussion around the dinner table might work?
    If you can get those pesky teenagers to sit down to dinner that is.
    Maybe develop a new slogan:
    Make nappy consent a happy consent?
    (ツ) (ツ)

    #82784

    Salina
    Participant

    This is the piece you’re referring to, I think, Tulip.

    Just another example of  the idiocy that passes for intellect today.

    http://www.news.com.au/national/victoria/abc-commentator-says-parents-should-ask-babies-for-consent-to-nappy-change/news-story/8fc2e67a11e24c8abb7819c114bc5168

     

     

    #82787

    williamthebold
    Participant

    Most parents talk to their babies, even though their babies won’t understand the words.
    The babies will understand the tone of voice though?
    At nappy changing time I think most parents talk to their babies.
    It doesn’t matter what is said. It is the tone of voice that counts?
    A comforting voice is best?
    I think asking consent would be less than beneficial, but a comforting monologue from the parent can be soothing for a child. Even singing can be that, I am told.
    These help to create an atmosphere of trust and security for the infant?

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