Don’t blacken their lives

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  • #93627
    williamthebold
    Participant

    When I hear chants like ‘black lives matter’ my first thought is; yes, but that is a negative, even racist, comment.
    All lives matter, regardless of race or colour.
    People who chant such things are immediately creating a negative concept in a listener’s mind.
    They are separating people in to at least two groups, and insinuating aggression and confrontation.
    In public affairs, race and colour should never be portrayed in this way.

    Children will play happily together without such concerns.
    Why do we adults find it so hard I wonder?
    The same laws should ideally apply to all citizens, regardless of race or colour.
    Should some, for a genuine reason, not be able to comply with the laws, then that is a different matter.
    Perhaps this applies to those mentally or physically disabled in some way?
    Ample consideration needs to be given to those persons and their needs.

    Rules are there to lead us away from harmful pursuits; not to restrict normal activities?

    #93630
    tivolidreamer
    Participant

    German Lopez
    says it very well.

    It’s a common conversation these days: One person says, “Black lives matter.” Then another responds, “No, all lives matter.”

    It’s also a complete misunderstanding of what the phrase “black lives matter” means. The person on the receiving end interprets the phrase as “black lives matter more than any other lives.”

    But the point of Black Lives Matter isn’t to suggest that black lives should be or are more important than all other lives. Instead, it’s simply pointing out that black people’s lives are relatively undervalued in the US — and more likely to be ended by police — and the country needs to recognize that inequity to bring an end to it.

    To this end, a better way to understand Black Lives Matter is by looking at its driving phrase as “black lives matter, too.” So all lives do matter, obviously, but it’s one subset of lives in particular that’s currently undervalued in America.

    #93631
    penguinpetepenguinpete
    Participant

    I agree with that interpretation, Tiv. “Black lives matter” is a rejoinder to those who think that black lives DON’T matter. Sure, all lives matter, but black lives ALSO matter.

    #93634
    tivolidreamer
    Participant

    Pete it great having you here. The conservative view is well represented on senior sites. You read very little from moderates or the left.
    I recall there was a time on greypath when there were great left posters but they were driven out.
    I find william to be a very interesting poster and lets us disagree without ridicule.
    I am certainly not trying to censure william or Rachel, both outstanding posters.
    I simply disagree very strongly.
    Back to topic.
    There are some excellent articles which explain black lives matter extremely well.
    I do not go along with the all lives matter reaction.

    #93635
    tivolidreamer
    Participant

    To explain much more effectively why …all lives matter is not as inclusive as people think.
    By the way…all lives matter has been adopted Its been adopted by the far right and Klan too.
    I once wrote an article about what ai call the polite racist.

    https://www.vox.com/2016/7/11/12136140/black-all-lives-matter

    #93637
    williamthebold
    Participant

    Thank you for the link Mr Tiv.
    I offer the following comment.
    If a person makes a claim, without making his intent clear, others can misinterpret what is said.
    It is not up to a reader to assume anything, or to add words to make the meaning of a statement clearer to him.
    Should a reader do that, the ‘new’ meaning might be wide of the mark.
    So we must take each statement at face value.
    Read it as it is written.
    It is what it is.
    We should not go around too many corners to avoid an obvious interpretation?

    #93661
    tivolidreamer
    Participant

    Huh?

    I guess you are too clever for me.
    Have no idea what you mean?

    #93662
    williamthebold
    Participant

    I suppose we just don’t think the same Mr Tiv.
    Suppose someone makes a statement, such as, ‘this morning I saw a tall man wearing a tan coat and blue jeans walking along Main Street.’
    All that means is that someone saw the man. There is no further information.
    How we react to the statement, our understanding of it, depends on why it was said.
    If we don’t know what that was, we cannot just assume it.
    We might be wrong.

    Let us suppose there has been a robbery.
    Police are seeking to talk to a tall man last seen wearing a tan coat and blue jeans.
    It is thought he was present during the robbery.
    The fact that he was seen on Main Street that morning would be important for them to know.
    At least one person would be able to report what he saw.
    Being associated with a robbery, people would likely be wary of the man.

    Let us suppose instead that a tall man is missing from his home.
    His family are concerned.
    He was last seen wearing a tan coat and blue jeans.
    His appearance on Main Street would be significant.
    People would rally to assist, and find him if they could?
    A different approach.

    Now let us suppose instead that the statement is part of a humorous story.
    There would be further information, and no doubt a hearty laugh at the end of the telling.
    Once again, a different response by those who heard it.

    So how we react to a statement depends entirely on why it was said.
    On what was happening to cause the statement to be made.
    On the circumstances attending it.
    With just the statement itself to go on, we cannot assume any particular context.
    We must not add our own ideas to it, just so it makes more sense to us.
    Because if we add the wrong idea, the meaning of the statement changes to something not intended.

    So we can only take statements at face value.
    If we don’t understand them, we must wait for more information to be forthcoming.
    We shouldn’t embellish them to suit ourselves.
    We mustn’t jump to conclusions.
    When I followed the link, and read the story, I thought that might be what was happening.

    #93663
    Salina
    Participant

         Cases                  Recovered                Deaths.

     

    If a person makes a claim, without making his intent clear, others can misinterpret what is said.

    It is not up to a reader to assume anything, or to add words to make the meaning of a statement clearer to him.

    Should a reader do that, the ‘new’ meaning might be wide of the mark.

    So we must take each statement at face value.

    Read it as it is written.

    It is what it is.

    We should not go around too many corners to avoid an obvious interpretation

    ………………………………………..

    William may I interpret your words as I understand.

    As individuals inhabiting this world, we each have our own minds and intellect.    I am fully aware  that I am of average intelligence, and quite happy at that level.     Like everyone else I’m endowed with the ability to think and observe the world around me, plus, listen to others.

    So each one of us will see things from our own individual point of view, and we will agree with some, but not with others.   Sometimes, we may change our mind by listening to others, and so broaden our point of view.

    Importantly, we live in a country where we are allowed to speak our mind without fear.

     

     

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